Bibliotheken Tentoonstellingen Judaica in Leiden

Judaica in Leiden

An exhibition in Leiden University Library at the occasion of the Congress of European Association of Jewish Studies, Amsterdam 21-25 juli 2002.

Inhoud

Introduction

I.
 BIBLE AND BIBLE COMMENTARIES
II.
 RABBINIC LITERATURE
III.
 LITURGY
IV.
 SCIENCE AND PHILOSOPHY
V.
 KARAITICA
VI.
 KABBALAH & MYSTICISM
VII.
 CHRISTIANITY AND HEBRAISM


II. RABBINIC LITERATURE


1148 bytesTalmud Yerushalmi
Manuscript onparchment, 2 vols., 25 Adar I 5049 (17 February 1289). Italian semi-cursive script.
Or. 4720 b, ff. 32b-33a (in volume 2).
¶ The only known surviving copy of the complete Palestinian Talmud. As Steinschneider first discovered in the 1850’s, this manuscript was used as typesetter’s copy for the first printed edition of the Palestinian Talmud, published by Daniel Bomberg in Venice in 1523-1524. Indications of the intended lay-out of the pages to be printed, as well as smudges of
ink can traced back to its use in Bomberg’s printing office. The manuscript was restored and rebound in
1082 bytes1973.

1115 bytesSefer he-Arukh
Nathan ben Yehi’el of Rome (1035 – c. 1110). Manuscript on parchment, 12th – 14th century, Germany. Ashkenazi semi-cursive script
Or. 4722, ff. 85v-86r.
Lexicon of Talmudic and Rabbinic literature. This dictionary, with its many quotations from the Talmud and other classical Rabbinical works, is preceded in this manuscript by the first dictionary of the Bible in Hebrew and its rival counterpart. Like Rashi’s commentaries (see Exhibit 3) it achieved great importance by rendering the mass of rabbinic writings
accessible to the Jewish scholars of early medieval
1075 bytes Europe.
As mentioned, the manuscript includes:
(1) Mahberet, by Menahem ben Jacob ibn Saruq (10th century).
(2) Critical remarks (Hassagot) on the Mahberet by Menahem’s rival Dunash
b. Labrat (10th cent.).
Both texts deal with the lexicography of the Hebrew Bible.

1184 bytesYalqut ha-Makhiri
Makhir b. Abba Mari (14th century?). Manuscript on paper, ante 1415, Southern Europe.
Sefardi semi-cursive script.
Or. 4724, f. 2r.
¶ There are many speculations about this work, but little is known about the origin of the Yalqut ha-Makhiri. As noted on fol. 2r., this book was sold by ‘Isaac Doyen de Lunel to Crescas (?) on the 8th of Tammuz in the year 5175’ (1415), thus determining a terminus ante quem for its origin.


vorige pagina volgende pagina